Nationwide entries are now being sought for the Sunshine Coast Art Prize 2019 – one of the most prestigious regional 2D art prizes in Australia.

The Art Prize offers a major cash prize of $25,000 sponsored by Sunshine Coast Council.

Arts Portfolio Councillor Rick Baberowski said the Sunshine Coast Art Prize was the flagship contemporary art award for our healthy, smart, creative region.

“The Art Prize is an award with a growing national reputation and is highly respected by the arts industry, art collectors and the broader community,” Cr Baberowski said.

“Continued investment by council, combined with eminent judges and the valued sponsors, has seen the Sunshine Coast Art Prize grow to become one of the nation’s leading regional art awards.

“The quality of submissions we receive each year culminates in one of the signature exhibitions for the region and I very much look forward to seeing this year’s entries.”

Caloundra Regional Gallery curator Hamish Sawyer said the high-profile award was expected to attract entries from some of Australia’s best contemporary and emerging artists.

“The national profile of the award is continuing to grow, as was proven by the calibre of entries received from across the country last year,” Mr Sawyer said.

“Our 2019 judge, Alison Kubler, who has more than 20 years’ experience working as a curator in museums and galleries across Australia, will have the enviable task of selecting a winner from what I’m sure will be an exceptional list of finalists.”

Sunshine Coast Art Prize 2019 finalists will be announced in April and will be showcased in an exhibition held at Caloundra Regional Gallery from July 24 to September 15.

The winning work will be acquired into the Sunshine Coast Art Collection.

Prize details

The Sunshine Coast Art Prize 2019 offers a prize pool of more than $30,000 in cash and prizes including:

·      an acquisitive major prize of $25,000 cash sponsored by Sunshine Coast Council

·      a non-acquisitive Highly Commended prize of $5000 sponsored by the De Deyne family

·      a non-acquisitive People’s Choice prize of $2500 sponsored by Caloundra Chamber of Commerce

·      a Sunshine Coast Art Prize Residency sponsored by Caloundra Regional Gallery and Montville Country Cabins.

Sunshine Coast Art Prize 2019 online entries are now open and will close at 5pm on Monday, April 8. Entry is open to any Australian resident.

For more details, including terms and conditions of entry, visit the Caloundra Regional Gallery website.

View a gallery of previous Sunshine Coast Art Prize winners on the gallery website.

Owned and operated by Sunshine Coast Council, Caloundra Regional Gallery is located at 22 Omrah Avenue and is open Tuesday to Friday 10am – 4pm and Saturday and Sunday 10am – 2pm.

You can now follow Caloundra Regional Gallery on Facebook and Instagram @caloundraregionalgallery

About the judge

Alison Kubler has a double major in Art History from the University of Queensland, Australia, and a Masters in Post-war and Contemporary Art History from Manchester University, England.

Alison has more than 20 years’ experience working as a curator in museums and galleries in Australia, including full-time curatorial positions at QUT Art Museum and Gold Coast City Art Gallery, and has also developed programs for Art Gallery of South Australia.

Alison is a Member of the Council of the National Gallery of Australia, a Board Director of the Museum of Brisbane, an Ambassador for the Institute of Modern Art, and an Ambassador for the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. 

Alison is a regular contributor to art journals and magazines such as Art Collector, MUSEUM, Manuscript, Neue Luxury and the Australian Financial Review Magazine on the subjects of art and fashion.

Alison worked on the 2018 fashion and art program for the Sherman Centre for Culture and Ideas (SCCI) and was appointed editor of VAULT Australasian Art & Culture magazine in May 2018.


The Official Closing: Friday 18th January 2019, 1-3pm
Location: Artspace, Maroochydore Library
Exhibition Dates: 17 December 2018 – 25 January 2019

Caloundra Regional Gallery and Sunshine Coast Libraries present the next exhibition for the Maroochydore Library Artspace. Local artist Marvene Ash explores the hinterland of Maleny and wide plains of Goondiwindi, exposing the beauty of both regions. A closing event for the exhibition will take place on Friday 18th January 2019, at the Maroochydore Library Artspace.
Cash bar at the closing event provided by Friends of Maroochydore Library. All welcome.

New gallery exhibition features award-winning artists from the Girringun Aboriginal Arts Centre

Opening on December 13, Caloundra Regional Gallery is proud to present Manggan – gather, gathers, gathering, the first national touring exhibition of contemporary works by award-winning artists from the Girringun Aboriginal Arts Centre.

From the Far North Queensland town of Cardwell, the 19 Girringun artists’ superbly handcrafted works, displayed alongside historical from the South Australian Museum and ephemera, including photographs, provide a unique opportunity for gallery visitors to view and engage with the distinctive Aboriginal rainforest art traditions and culture from the Girringun region.  

The artists’ ancestral tools, Bagu (body) with Jiman (sticks), were traditionally used to make fire, but today have been transformed into an iconic art form by the Girringun artists.

Made from clay, timber and string, and painted with ochres, these artworks evoke the spirit of the old people. 

The contemporary objects are instilled with newer values which reflect aesthetic taste, authenticity, economic pressures and an element of nostalgia.

Displayed side by side, the new and the old, the objects create a dialogue of contrast and of change.

Artists featured in the exhibition include Daniel Beeron, George Beeron Snr, Maureen Beeron, Theresa Beeron, Nancy Cowan, Nephi Denham, Sandra Escott, Tonya Grant, Judith Henry, Clarence Kinjun, Doris Kinjun, Abe Muriata, Alison Murray, Debra Murray, Emily Murray, John Murray, Ninney Murray, Sally Murray and Eileen Tep.

The exhibition will be on display until January 27, 2019.

This summer, visitors to the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art (QAGOMA) will discover more than 400 artworks by over 80 individuals, collectives and groups with ‘The 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art’ (APT9) open from tomorrow.

QAGOMA Director Chris Saines said APT9 was an expansive free exhibition that captured the energy of new art being created in Asia, the Pacific and Australia.

‘Developed by our specialist team of QAGOMA curators, APT9 presents some of the most exciting and important contemporary art being created in the region, including major new commissions designed for the Gallery’s signature spaces,’ Mr Saines said.

‘Following three years of curatorial travel and extensive research, the ninth edition of our flagship exhibition series offers an accessible contemporary art experience across the entire Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA), including the Children’s Art Centre and the Australian Cinémathèque, and key spaces at the Queensland Art Gallery (QAG) until 28 April 2019.

Arts Minister Leeanne Enoch said APT had bolstered Queensland as a must-see destination since 1993.

“Each APT enriches our understanding of the social and cultural fabric of the Asia Pacific, and engages us with the ideas and experiences of life in Asia, the Pacific and Australia as expressed by contemporary artists,” Minister Enoch said.

“APT has attracted more than 3 million visitors over its 25-year history. Most recently in 2015, APT8 attracted an audience of more than 600,000 visitors, delivering an estimated $21.83 million to the Queensland economy,” Minister Enoch said.

The exhibition includes eight interactive projects developed by artists especially for children and families in APT9 Kids, regionally-focused cinema programs such as ‘New Bollywood: Currents in Indian Cinema’ and ‘Microwave Films of the Marshall Islands’, and a public program of artist talks, tours, discussions, performances and drop-in workshops.

‘A quarter of a century on from its inception in 1993, APT has now been seen by more than three million visitors and remains the pre-eminent recurring exhibition of contemporary art from Asia, the Pacific and Australia,’ Mr Saines said.

Arts Minister Leeanne Enoch said audiences travelling to Queensland from interstate and overseas to visit the APT,could anticipate an enlightening and immersive exhibition full of surprises.

‘We encourage everyone to come and experience the Triennial this weekend and return for visits all through summer,’ Minister Enoch said.

Selected highlights of APT9 include:

  • APT9 Artist Conversations. This weekend, hear from artists: Kim Beom, Nona Garcia, Tada Hengsapkul,Jonathan Jones, Karrabing Film Collective, Yuko Mohri, Anne Noble, Lisa Reihana and Areta Wilkinson.
  • This weekend, Marshallese poet, teacher and artist Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner will give two performances of Lorro: OfWings and Seas 2018 highlighting her engagement with JAKI-ED weaving as a site of cultural resistance andexpression.
  • Unveiled for the first time in APT9 are Iranian-born artist Iman Raad’s riotously colourful mural andembroidered velvet banners referencing Persian miniature painting, Iranian folk art and Pakistani truck painting.
  • Encounter a huge, hand-rendered map on GOMA’s Long Gallery wall by leading Chinese artist Qiu Zhijie thatdepicts an archipelago of technology-related moral quandaries.
  • Filipino artist Nona Garcia’s graphic installation for APT9 utilises the Queensland Art Gallery’s large glasswindows as light boxes for a mandala installation created from X-rayed animal bones.
  • For the duration of APT9, Japanese artist Yuko Mohri’s sound installation of modified pianos and found objectswill play an elegant musical composition in GOMA’s River Lounge extending onto the outdoor veranda.
  • Women’s Wealth is a specially commissioned project for APT9 that includes the premiere of a new video byTaloi Havini textiles, pottery and body adornment by women artists from the Autonomous Region ofBougainville in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands archipelago as well as Australia.
  • Australian artist Jonathan Jones’ installation untitled (giran) 2018, is a major new work for APT9 comprisingsound and almost 2000 winged sculptures evoking birds in collective flight.
  • New Zealand photographer Anne Noble’s Conversation: A cabinet of wonder 2018, is a multi-part installationthat includes a fully functioning bee hive.
  • The APT9 all-ages Summer Festival from 18-20 January 2019 will include artist workshops, performances,tours, live music, films and storytelling. A special one-night only edition of Up Late with live music by Ngaiire (Syd), Bottlesmoker (Indonesia), May Lyn (Brisbane), plus performances, DJs, talks, art-making and more willbe held on 18 January. Up Late tickets on sale Friday 23 November www.qaogma.qld.gov.au/uplate.

The artists participating in APT9 are:

Jananne AL-ANI, Zico ALBAIQUNI, Sadik Kwaish ALFRAJI, Monira AL QADIRI, Rasheed ARAEEN, Martha ATIENZA, Kushana BUSH, CAO Fei, Gary CARSLEY, Roberto CHABET, CHEN Zhe, Kawayan DE GUIA, Enkhbold Togmidshiirev, ERUB/LIFOU PROJECT, Nona GARCIA, Simon GENDE, Lola GREENO, GUNANTUNA (Tolai people) led by Gideon KAKABIN, Shilpa GUPTA, Tada HENGSAPKUL, Gavin HIPKINS, Joyce HO, HOU I-Ting, HTEIN LIN, IMAGES OF THE CRISIS, Zahra IMANI, Mao ISHIKAWA, JAKI-ED PROJECT, JEONG Geumhyung, Kathy JETÑIL-KIJINER, Jonathan JONES, KARRABING FILM COLLECTIVE, Ali KAZIM, Aisha KHALID, Naiza KHAN, Waqas KHAN, KIM Beom, Meiro KOIZUMI, Kapulani LANDGRAF, Idas LOSIN, LY Hoàng Ly, Gregory Dausi MOAH, MOCHU, Yuko MOHRI, Vincent NAMATJIRA, NGUYỄN Trinh Thi, Anne NOBLE, Aditya NOVALI, Elia NURVISTA, Shinro OHTAKE, Donna ONG and Robert ZHAO Renhui, Alair PAMBEGAN, PANGROK SULAP, Bona PARK, Bounpaul PHOTHYZAN, Souliya P HOUMIVONG, QIU Zhijie, Iman RAAD, Margaret RARRU and Helen GANALMIRRIWUY, Lisa REIHANA, Peter ROBINSON, Handiwirman SAPUTRA, Mithu SEN, Hassan SHARIF, Tcheu SIONG, Jakkai SIRIBUTR, SOE YU NWE, Herman SOMUK, Harit SRIKHAO, Ayesha SULTANA, Latai TAUMOEPEAU, TUNGARU: THE KIRIBATI PROJECT led by Chris CHARTERIS, James TYLOR, VUTH Lyno, Munem WASIF, Boedi WIDJAJA, Areta WILKINSON,

WOMEN’S WEALTH, Sawangwongse YAWNGHWE, Pannaphan YODMANEE, YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES and ZHENG Guongu.

The Queensland Government is the Founding Supporter of the Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art series.

APT9 is made possible with the support of Strategic Partner Tourism and Events Queensland, Principal Partner the

Australia Council for the Arts, and Major Partner UAP. APT9 Kids is supported by Principal Benefactor the Tim Fairfax

Family Foundation.

Grab a unique gift at the gallery

Avoid the last-minute Christmas rush and head to Caloundra Regional Gallery for the final Friday3Live event of the year – the It’s a Wrap Artisan Market – on November 16 from 5.30-8pm.

Why not indulge in a little retail therapy and tick a few items off your gift list, meet the local makers and gallery store artists at the pop-up artisan stalls all while enjoying live music, complimentary snacks and drinks at bar prices.

Whether you love stationery, ceramics, jewellery, tea or homewares, there will be 15 amazing stalls to browse in addition to the gallery store.

Free gift wrapping will be available for your purchases.

Artisan stalls include:

Notely

RillP Design

Succulent Artistry

Tootzzi – jewellery

Rebecca Ward

Jan Roebuck

AR-T

Pottery for the Planet

Tamaryn Goodyear

Asha Jane & Co

Aileen Greig

Sarah Sheppard

Mood Macrame

Coastal Studio

Juwel

Friday3Live is held at the gallery on the third Friday of the month and includes a changing program of interactive activities, music, talks and performances.

For more details on all of the programs and workshops held at the gallery, visit the gallery website – gallery.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au.

You can also follow the gallery on Facebook and Instagram.


Maxine Stibbe

(RE) EMERGING ARTIST PROFILE  by Skye Leong

Maxine Stibbe joined the Brisbane art scene in the late 1980’s, and her passion for community arts, visual arts and Indigenous arts, has led her on a journey around the globe. I first met Maxine back in her twenties at the start of her arts career. The Honourable Matt Foley, the then Arts Minister, addressed the opening of her first solo exhibition at Fox Galleries in Brisbane.

Twenty years and a few kids later, Maxine is now living in on the Sunshine Coast, looking back on a diverse arts career spanning roles in art making, community arts development, set design and construction, poetry and performance. As a multi-platform artist, she works in paint, ceramics, stone, metal, photography, multimedia and text.

During her time with a young family, Maxine stayed active in the arts, through study, coordinating community arts projects, running her studio/gallery in Noosaville, and volunteering at the Noosa Regional Gallery. She now has a studio at Tewantin, backing on to the Tewantin National Park, and has artworks and murals permanently on display at Zabe Espresso Bar in Tewantin.

At the moment Maxine is represented in two exhibitions in Melbourne at the Brunswick Street Gallery:  Emerging Photographic Edition and Australasia Now. For the latter, her piece entitled Big Fish City Dreams is about being the Muse, the female artist, being consumed by the Big Fish art machinations, the storm of life, the grid and repetition, and the clouds of energy, internet sending information and electrical storms of societal constructs breaking down.

Maxine is currently doing an Arts Residency at The Black Duck Gallery in the vibrant creative town of Yandina.  The artist in residence pilot program is a series of week-long residencies for artists to share, create and exhibit their work. The self-contained cottage is located on the road to the renowned Spirit House Restaurant and beautiful Mt Ninderry.

As part of her residency, Maxine has full use of the Black Duck Gallery, and will have her exhibition hanging in the gallery for two weeks after her stay.

Maxine will be having a solo exhibition, Max Melbourne, at Brunswick Street Gallery in December. The exhibition will take a multi-platform approach to representing the challenges of motherhood and women’s art practice in a regional environment, being showcased within an urban gallery space.

Richard Waugh – from portraiture to architecture

Observe!

According to Richard Waugh, this is the key to being a good photographer.

It’s likely you’ve viewed Richard’s work many times without realising, as it has featured in national newspapers and magazines throughout his career as a press photographer.  But his true artistry is shows itself /evident in many other forms of photography such as portraiture, cuisine and architecture.

Growing up in the far west Queensland outback, Waugh was taken by the stunning country landscapes, and he learned about respect and caring for the environment from the local Indigenous community. When a neighbouring friend bought a camera, he began experimenting in photography and was hired by a local wedding photographer. With little experience handling a camera and one hour of training, Waugh took on his first commission.

Breaking free of the farmer tradition, Waugh left for the city to pursue his passion. He completed his photographic studies at the Queensland College of Art and took to the streets in search of work. With few job opportunities, Waugh and a friend from college opened a photography gallery, which proved to be one of few in the city. While this adventure was exciting and drew many people to its doors, it was sadly closed a mere eight months after its debut. Determined to stay immersed in the photography industry, he began a job packing prints for Kodak, and later sold photographic equipment for a time.

His big opportunity came when he was hired as a dark room manager printing black and white film for The Sun newspaper. That was the beginning of an extensive career as press photographer for major Australian and State newspapers and magazines.

Waugh moved to Sydney in the nineties, where he relished the iconic places to shoot, in particular the historic architecture the city offered. He also experimented with more creative pieces, such as a black and white series on Bondi Beach. Eventually, he returned to Brisbane, where he still resides and now works as a freelance artist.

The digital age

Waugh recalls the time when photography was transitioning from familiar film into digital, and how strange it was to relearn aspects of his craft. He recalls the ‘beautiful feeling’ of film, especially when the photograph is laid out in front of you instead of on a screen, as it predominantly is nowadays. The digital age also brought with it redundancies due to the loss of advertising caused by online news and social media.

Waugh admits he has mixed views on photo manipulation. He recalls doing a commissioned shoot in which the setting was dreary and the image lacked overall excitement. With some digital manipulation he managed to transform the dull image into a place of paradise. While he believes   photo manipulation is good for some things, he also feels it is a bit deceitful. The ‘purist’ and the ‘documenter’ in him dislike the use of photo manipulation, as photographs are a way of detailing history. In hundreds of years to come people may want to know what certain things looked like, and if they are altered or digitally removed, the photograph becomes a false representation.

It’s not about the celebrities

One of Richard’s photographic passions is portraiture. While he says photographing prime ministers and celebrities is amazing, the real excitement lies with everyday people. He finds it a great privilege to photograph those who have overcome adversity. He believes that we are ‘spoilt in the people [we] meet along the way’, which proves that the extraordinary really does lie within the ordinary.

Waugh is also very interested in urban architecture and is drawn to old buildings like the stone terraces of Sydney, as well as modern construction. He enjoys capturing his surroundings and observing how people move and interact in their environment.

Destination dreams

The diversity of Waugh’s photography is evident when you ask about his dream destinations. In terms of natural locations, Waugh says he would love to shoot Tasmanian landscapes, Cape York and the Bungle Bungles in Western Australia.  For more urban destinations, Waugh loves the Melbourne laneways, and other narrow paths in the city. He’d also like to do a series on old sheds; this stems from when he worked for Queensland Country Life and would often drive past dozens of old shacks in the outback.

Words of advice

Waugh’s advice to budding photographers is observation and patience, and remembering that the equipment doesn’t make the photographer.  He stresses the importance of technique when capturing an image. He believes composition is critical to how a person’s eye ’travels within the frame’, and that shooting in black and white – as he frequently does – helps to connect the points within the image.

His other wise words apply not just to photography but to any pursuit.  He says that ego, an undeniable fault of most of us, is also pointless. Unnecessarily criticising others and yourself is futile and doesn’t help you or those around you to improve.

Upcoming adventures

Waugh is now a freelance photographer and is striving to become ‘more relaxed’ about photography. He still thrives on black and white images, as well as architecture, but film has recently sparked his interest, and he plans to experiment more with it.

He is in the process of creating a black and white series of dogs on the beach, further details of which are yet to be announced. Another series titled ‘Human Movement in the Urban Environment’ showing the interactions between human beings and their surroundings is also in the making. While it is not yet complete, it is sure to be stunning.

For more information on Richard Waugh and his photography, visit www.richardwaughphotography.com.au



About Amica……

Amica Whincop is an Australian abstract artist, recognised for her undulating ‘stone-like’ motifs and her ability to create a gentle equilibrium between spaces. Predominantly influenced by the intricacies of nature, its fragility and strength, there is something simultaneously tranquil and passionate about the pieces she creates. Her love of nature grew from a childhood living beside the rugged seashores of the Isle of Wight, England, creating a connection with the environment that has only strengthened through global travel and her eventual emigration to Australia.

Art has always been her vehicle from which to channel peace, quiet the mind, and inspire her soul. Her hope is that this calm energy transfers to the viewer.

Educated as a visual art artist and educator, she graduated from the Queensland University of Technology in 2003, holding a Bachelor of Visual Arts and a Bachelor of Secondary Education.


Now settled in the country town of Gympie with her husband and three children, Amica’s work continues to gain national and international recognition, engaging a wide audience, including those who often disassociate with abstract art.

Aside from attending upcoming shows, you can follow her process on Instagram.

email: hello@amicawhincop.com 

An Interview with Jandamarra Cadd

An interview with Jandamarra Cadd

Jandamarra Cadd is a Sunshine Coast artist whose stunning portraits provide a moving message of unity, where Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians walk together, healing the wounds of the past.

Jandamarra has been a finalist in many major Australian art prizes, including the Archibald Prize in 2014. He is also an inspirational speaker who works closely with young Indigenous youth.

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Creativity, Community, Culture